2021 Lamborghini Aventador

Overview

In a world that has become heavily reliant on technology, the 2021 Lamborghini Aventador takes a more nostalgic look at things. The large Lambo is a triumphant tribute to supercars of old, with its flamboyant facade and vociferous V-12. The 730-plus-hp 6.5-liter engine that’s mounted behind the driver is naturally aspirated and crowd-pleasing, but the Aventador’s automated-manual transmission can be clunky in traffic. This Italian exotic looks good in both coupe and convertible form, though the latter’s top is cumbersome to remove. Despite its substantial girth, the Aventador is surprisingly athletic. The track-tuned SVJ model makes carving canyon roads or logging lap times even more exhilarating. The 2021 Aventador is hugely expensive and far from subtle, but it’s a brilliant send-off to a soon-to-be-extinct breed of old-school supercars.

What’s New for 2021?

For 2021, the Aventador receives very minor updates. The S can now be equipped with forged Leirion wheels as well as an Arancio Dac center wheel lock. The SVJ now comes with a glovebox, and you can order the badge in exposed carbon fiber.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The Aventador powertrain hierarchy begins with a mid-mounted naturally aspirated 6.5-liter V-12 that develops 730 horsepower. The engine’s 509 pound-feet of torque makes its way to the wheels via a seven-speed automated-manual transmission. This basic setup is shared among the three distinct variants, but the track-focused SVJ (which stands for Superveloce Jota) has various enhancements that unlock extra horsepower and torque. We drove this brutally powerful monster and its roofless counterpart and experienced their tremendous acceleration crushing cornering forces. The hefty machines heaved through the corners, but their incredible grip and four-wheel-steering systems helped them change direction on a dime. We have also driven the Aventador S and Aventador S roadster and found the latter’s top-down ability makes it the better car for listening to the V-12’s thrilling timbre.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The Aventador powertrain hierarchy begins with a mid-mounted naturally aspirated 6.5-liter V-12 that develops 730 horsepower. The engine’s 509 pound-feet of torque makes its way to the wheels via a seven-speed automated-manual transmission. This basic setup is shared among the three distinct variants, but the track-focused SVJ (which stands for Superveloce Jota) has various enhancements that unlock extra horsepower and torque. We drove this brutally powerful monster and its roofless counterpart and experienced their tremendous acceleration crushing cornering forces. The hefty machines heaved through the corners, but their incredible grip and four-wheel-steering systems helped them change direction on a dime. We have also driven the Aventador S and Aventador S roadster and found the latter’s top-down ability makes it the better car for listening to the V-12’s thrilling timbre.

Infotainment and Connectivity

The Aventador’s standard infotainment system is behind the times, with dated graphics and awkward integration. In addition to voice commands and Apple CarPlay capability, the company offers a performance data recorder that saves lap times and tracks data. If so inclined, buyers can select the upgraded audio system that adds door-mounted subwoofers and tweeters on the dashboard.

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